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(Ages 9-10)

Age-Based 2 (Ages 9-10)
  • US Large-Cap Equity
  • US Small-Cap Equity
  • International Equity
  • Global Equity
  • Multi Asset
  • Commodity-Related
  • Fixed Income






Underlying Funds (in alphabetical order)





AB Global Real Estate Investment Fund II
Investment Objective and Principal Strategies.The Fund seeks total return from long-term growth of capital and income. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets in the equity securities of real estate investment trusts, or REITs, and other real estate industry companies, such as real estate operating companies.

The Fund invests in real estate companies that the Adviser believes have strong property fundamentals and management teams. The Fund seeks to invest in real estate companies whose underlying portfolios are diversified geographically and by property type. The Fund invests in U.S. and non-U.S. issuers. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests significantly (at least 40%--unless market conditions are not deemed favorable by the Adviser) in securities of non-U.S. companies. In addition, the Fund invests, under normal circumstances, in the equity securities of companies located in at least three countries.

The Fund's investment policies emphasize investment in companies determined by the Adviser to be undervalued relative to their peers, using a fundamental value approach. In selecting real estate equity securities, the Adviser's research and investment process seeks to identify globally those companies where the magnitude and growth of cash flow streams have not been appropriately reflected in the price of the security. These securities may trade at a more attractive valuation than others that may have similar overall fundamentals. The Adviser's fundamental research efforts are focused on forecasting the short- and long-term normalized cash generation capability of real estate companies by isolating supply and demand for property types in local markets, determining the replacement value of properties, assessing future development opportunities, and normalizing capital structures of real estate companies. The Fund may invest in mortgage-backed securities, which are securities that directly or indirectly represent participations in, or are collateralized by and payable from, mortgage loans secured by real property. These securities include mortgage pass-through certificates, real estate mortgage investment conduit certificates, or REMICs, and collateralized mortgage obligations, or CMOs. The Fund may also invest in short-term investment grade debt securities and other fixed-income securities.

Currencies can have a dramatic impact on equity return, significantly adding to returns in some years and greatly diminishing them in others. The Adviser evaluates currency and equity positions separately and may seek to hedge the currency exposure resulting from securities positions when it finds the currency exposure unattractive. To hedge a portion of its currency risk, the Fund may from time to time invest in currency-related derivatives, including forward currency exchange contracts, futures contracts, options on futures contracts, swaps and options. The Adviser also may seek investment opportunities by taking long or short positions in currencies through the use of currency-related derivatives.

The Fund invests in equity securities that include common stock, shares of beneficial interest of REITs, and securities with common stock characteristics, such as preferred stock or convertible securities ("real estate equity securities"). The Fund may enter into forward commitments and standby commitment agreements. The Fund may enter into other derivatives transactions, such as options, futures contracts, forwards, and swaps. The Fund may use options strategies involving the purchase and/or writing of various combinations of call and/or put options, including on individual securities and stock indices, futures contracts (including futures contracts on individual securities and stock indices) or exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"). These transactions may be used, for example, to earn extra income, to adjust exposure to individual securities or markets, or to protect all or a portion of the Fund's portfolio from a decline in value, sometimes within certain ranges.

The Fund may, at times, invest in ETFs in lieu of making direct investments in equity securities. ETFs may provide more efficient and economical exposure to the type of companies and geographic locations in which the Fund seeks to invest than direct investments.

Principal Risks The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return, are market risk, interest rate risk, credit risk, real estate risk, foreign (non-U.S.) risk, currency risk, mortgage-related and/or other asset-backed securities risk, derivatives risk, leverage risk and management risk.


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AllianzGI Best Styles Global Equity
Investment Objective and Principal Strategies. The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by creating a diversified portfolio of global equities. The Fund will normally invest at least 80% of its net assets (plus borrowings made for investment purposes) in equity securities and equity-related instruments. The Fund normally invests at least 40% of its assets in non-U.S. securities, including emerging market securities. The portfolio managers intend to diversify the Fund's investments across geographic regions and economic sectors. The Fund may invest in issuers of any size market capitalization, including smaller capitalization companies.

The Fund's investment strategy centers on the portfolio managers' belief that individual investment styles (as described below) carry long-term "risk premiums" that are largely independent of the current economic or market environment and that can be captured using a disciplined investment approach.

The investment process begins with a broad investment universe containing at least 4,000 equity securities. Next, individual securities are evaluated based on quantitative "investment style" research and may also be evaluated by the Sub-Adviser's fundamental research team. Investment style research categorizes companies through a proprietary quantitative model that scores each company along several investment style categories, described below (Value, Earnings Change, Price Momentum, Growth, and Quality). Fundamental research evaluates each company identified as an investment candidate through the quantitative "investment style" research process using a wide range of company-specific information gathered by in-house analysts and external sources. In selecting individual stocks with attractive fundamental characteristics, the portfolio managers seek to diversify the mix of investment styles represented across the whole portfolio (i.e., by making sure high-scoring issuers from all of the investment styles are among the final holdings). The portfolio managers attempt to control for risk factors (such as over- and under-weights relative to the MSCI All Country World Index and the portfolio's sensitivity to broader market movements (or "beta")). The portfolio is managed with reference to the MSCI All Country World Index and the portfolio managers intend, under normal circumstances, to have at least 300 equity securities in the Fund's portfolio. The Fund may and intends to hold stocks that are not included in the MSCI All Country World Index.

The Value investment style selects equity securities that the portfolio managers believe have attractive valuations based on metrics including dividend yield and price-to-earnings, price-to-cash flow and price-tobook ratios, as compared to other equity securities in the investable universe. The Earnings Change investment style is designed to capture shorter-term, trend-following investment opportunities and generally selects equity securities with positive earnings revisions, announcements or surprises. The Price Momentum investment style is also trend-following and generally selects equity securities with positive price momentum and relative strength within the investable universe. The Growth investment style generally selects equity securities with expected and historical earnings growth and dividend growth. The Quality investment style generally emphasizes equity securities with strong profitability and historical earnings stability, and considers additional factors, such as whether a company has improving margins, positive net income, positive operating capital, decreasing long-term debt and high-quality earnings, among others. The Fund's research suggests that, while each of the investment styles described above can be individually successful over the long-term and during certain periods, each investment style may also experience "downswings" (i.e., during certain market, economic, or other conditions an individual investment style may underperform compared to the relevant broad equity market). Building a portfolio with a diversified mix of investment styles is the Fund's attempt to mitigate what the portfolio managers believe to be the cyclical nature of the individual investment styles. The Fund's diversified mix of investment styles is expected to remain fairly stable over time.

The Fund may participate in initial public offerings (IPOs). The Fund may also utilize foreign currency exchange contracts, stock index futures contracts, warrants and other derivative instruments.

Principal Risks The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return, are equity securities risk, market risk, issuer risk, non-U.S. investment risk, emerging markets risk, smaller company risk, credit and counterparty risk, currency risk, derivatives risk, focused investment risk, IPO risk, leveraging risk, liquidity risk, management risk and turnover risk.


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AllianzGI Global Allocation
Investment Objective and Principal Strategies. The Fund seeks after-inflation capital appreciation and current income. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective through a combination of active allocation between asset classes and actively managed strategies within those asset classes. The Fund allocates its investments among asset classes in response to changing market, economic, and political factors and events that the portfolio managers believe may affect the value of the Fund's investments. In making investment decisions for the Fund, the portfolio managers seek to identify trends and turning points in the global markets. To gain exposure to the various asset classes, the Fund incorporates actively managed strategies and/or passive instruments, including exchange-traded funds ("ETFs") and exchange-traded notes, and derivative instruments such as futures. The Fund also seeks to limit portfolio volatility. Volatility is a statistical measurement of the magnitude of up and down fluctuations in the value of a financial instrument or index over time.

The Fund invests directly and indirectly in globally diverse equity securities, including emerging market equities, and in U.S. dollar denominated fixed income securities. The Fund targets a long-term average strategic asset allocation of 60% to global equity exposure (the "Equity Component") and 40% to fixed income exposure (the "Fixed Income Component"). The Fund may also use an "Opportunistic Component" whereby it invests up to 10% of its assets in any combination of the following asset classes: emerging market debt, international debt, intermediate and long-term high yield debt (commonly known as "junk bonds"), commodities, U.S. and international small capitalization stocks and real estate securities, including U.S. and non-U.S. real estate investment trusts ("REITs"). The Fund may either invest directly in these different asset classes or indirectly through derivatives and other instruments.

Allocations to "opportunistic" asset classes within underlying diversified strategies are not included in the calculation of the Opportunistic Component of the Fund. For example, allocations to REITs within diversified equity strategies or instruments that are similar to that of the MSCI ACWI are not counted within the Fund's Opportunistic Component; however, direct allocations to REITS using futures on a REIT index or REIT ETFs will be counted within the Fund's Opportunistic Component. Similarly, when underlying diversified bond funds have risk and volatility profiles that the portfolio managers believe to be similar to (or less than) that of the Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond index, any allocations within those underlying diversified bond funds to "opportunistic" asset classes, such as high yield or emerging market debt, are also not counted towards the Opportunistic Component's 10% limit. Only securities, instruments or actively managed strategies whose primary purpose is to gain exposure to one or more of the opportunistic asset classes count towards the Opportunistic Component's 10% limit.

The portfolio managers analyze market cycles, economic cycles and valuations, of each asset class and their components and may adjust the Fund's exposures to individual holdings and asset classes. Depending on market conditions, the Equity Component may range between approximately 50% and 70% of the Fund's assets and the Fixed Income Component may range between approximately 30% and 50% of the Fund's assets. Apart from this strategic asset allocation, the Fund may use its Opportunistic Component. Combined investments in the Equity Component and the Opportunistic Component are limited to 80% of the Fund's assets at the time of investment. The portfolio managers adjust the Fund's exposure to the Equity Component, the Fixed Income Component, and the Opportunistic Component in response to momentum and momentum reversion signals in an effort to mitigate downside risk in times of severe market stress, and to increase the return potential in favorable markets. While the portfolio managers attempt to mitigate the downside risk to stabilize performance, there can be no assurance that the Fund will be successful in doing so. Momentum is the tendency of investments to exhibit persistence in their performance. Momentum reversion is the tendency that a performance trend will ultimately change and move in an opposite direction. The portfolio managers believe negative momentum suggests future periods of negative investment returns and increased volatility. When the portfolio managers recognize negative momentum for an asset class, the Fund may reduce its exposure to that asset class.

The portfolio managers believe positive momentum suggests future periods of positive investment returns and typical levels of market volatility. When the momentum signals for an asset class indicate positive momentum, the portfolio managers may increase the Fund's exposure to that asset class.

In addition to the momentum and momentum reversion signals, the portfolio managers also apply fundamental analysis to locate opportunities to seek to improve the Fund's return. Fundamental analysis may contribute to an adjustment of the Fund's exposure to the asset classes that exhibit the strongest return prospects. The fundamental analysis attempts to locate opportunities not identified from momentum-related signals.

After determining the asset allocation among the Components, the portfolio managers select particular investments in an effort to obtain exposure to the relevant mix of asset classes. The Fund may invest in any type of equity or fixed income security, including common and preferred stocks, mutual funds, ETFs, warrants and convertible securities, mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities and government and corporate bonds. The Fund may invest in securities of companies of any capitalization, including smaller capitalization companies. The Fund also may make investments intended to provide exposure to one or more commodities or securities indices, currencies, and real estate-related securities. The Fund is expected to be highly diversified across industries, sectors, and countries. The Fund may liquidate a holding if it locates another instrument that offers a more attractive exposure to an asset class or when there is a change in the Fund's target asset allocation, or if the instrument is otherwise deemed inappropriate.

In implementing these investment strategies, the Fund may make substantial use of over-the-counter (OTC) or exchange-traded derivatives, including futures contracts, interest rate swaps, total return swaps, credit default swaps, options (puts and calls) purchased or sold by the Fund, currency forwards, and structured notes. The Fund may use derivatives for a variety of purposes, including: as a hedge against adverse changes in the market price of securities, interest rates, or currency exchange rates; as a substitute for purchasing or selling securities; to increase the Fund's return as a non-hedging strategy that may be considered speculative; and to manage portfolio characteristics. The Fund may maintain a significant percentage of its assets in cash and cash equivalents which will serve as margin or collateral for the Fund's obligations under derivative transactions.

Principal Risks The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return, are allocation risk, market risk, issuer risk, equity securities risk, management risk, credit and counterparty risk, currency risk, derivatives risk, emerging markets risk, fixed income risk, focused investment risk, high yield risk, index risk, interest rate risk, IPO risk, leveraging risk, liquidity risk, mortgage-related and other asset-backed risk, non-U.S. investment risk, REIT and real-estate related investment risk, smaller company risk, tax risk, turnover risk, underlying fund and other acquired fund risks, and variable distribution risk.


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DFA Commodity Strategy Portfolio
Investment Objective and Principal Strategies. The Portfolio seeks total return consisting of capital appreciation and current income. The Portfolio seeks to achieve its investment objective by generally investing in a universe of allowable commodity-linked derivative instruments and fixed income investment opportunities. The Portfolio gains exposure to commodities markets by investing in derivative instruments, such as structured notes whose principal and/or coupon payments are linked to commodities or commodity indices, in swap agreements, and/or in other commodity-linked instruments (such as futures contracts on individual commodities or commodity indices). The Portfolio may invest up to 25% of its total assets in Dimensional Cayman Commodity Fund I Ltd. (the "Subsidiary"), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Portfolio formed in the Cayman Islands, which has the same investment objective as the Portfolio and has a strategy of investing in derivative instruments, such as commodity-linked swap agreements and other commodity-linked instruments, futures contracts on individual commodities or commodity indices, and options on these instruments. The Portfolio, directly and/or through its investment in the Subsidiary, expects to use such derivatives extensively as part of its investment strategy.

The Portfolio will invest in obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. and foreign governments, their agencies and instrumentalities, bank obligations, commercial paper, repurchase agreements, obligations of other domestic and foreign issuers having investment grade ratings (i.e., rated AAA to BBB- by Standard & Poor's Rating Group ("S&P") or Fitch Ratings Ltd. ("Fitch") or Aaa to Baa3 by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. ("Moody's")), securities of domestic or foreign issuers denominated in U.S. dollars but not trading in the United States, and obligations of supranational organizations. At the present time, Dimensional Fund Advisors LP (the "Advisor") expects that most fixed income investments will be made in the obligations of issuers that are located in developed countries. However, in the future, the Advisor anticipates investing in issuers located in other countries as well. The fixed income securities in which the Portfolio invests are considered investment grade at the time of purchase.

The Portfolio's fixed income securities primarily will mature within five years from the date of settlement, and the Portfolio maintains an average portfolio duration of three years or less. Duration is a measure of the expected life of a fixed income security that is used to determine the sensitivity of a security's price to changes in interest rates. The longer a security's duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Similarly, a portfolio with a longer average portfolio duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a fund with a shorter average portfolio duration. In making purchase decisions, if the anticipated maturity risk premium is greater for longer-term securities in the eligible maturity range, the Advisor will focus investment in the longer-term area, otherwise, the Portfolio will focus investment in the shorter-term area of the eligible maturity range.

The Portfolio's investments may include foreign securities denominated in foreign currencies. The Portfolio intends to hedge foreign currency exposure to protect against uncertainty in the level of future foreign currency rates, to hedge against fluctuations in currency exchange rates or to transfer balances from one currency to another. The Portfolio may hedge such currency exposure by entering into foreign forward currency contracts. In regard to currency hedging, it is generally not possible to precisely match the foreign currency exposure of such forward foreign currency contracts to the value of the securities involved due to fluctuations in the market values of such securities and cash flows into and out of the Portfolio between the date a forward foreign currency contract is entered into and the date it expires. The Portfolio also may enter into credit default swaps on issuers or indices to buy or sell credit protection to hedge its credit exposure, gain market or issuer exposure without owning the underlying securities, or increase the Portfolio's expected total return.

The Portfolio may lend its portfolio securities to generate additional income.

Principal Risks The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return, are market risk, commodity risk, derivatives risk, focus risk, foreign securities and currencies risk, foreign government debt risk, interest rate risk, credit risk, call risk, liquidity risk, subsidiary risk, tax risk, leveraging risk, regulatory risk, valuation risk, securities lending risk and cyber security risk.


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DFA Inflation-Protected Securities Portfolio
Investment Objective and Principal Strategies.The Fund seeks to provide inflation protection and earn current income consistent with inflation-protected securities. The Inflation-Protected Portfolio seeks its investment objective by investing in a universe of inflation-protected securities that are structured to provide returns linked to the rate of inflation over the long-term. The Inflation-Protected Portfolio ordinarily invests in inflation-protected securities issued by the U.S. Government and its agencies and instrumentalities and the credit quality of such inflation-protected securities will be that of such applicable U.S. government, agency or instrumentality issuer.

As a non-fundamental policy, under normal circumstances, the Portfolio will invest at least 80% of its net assets in inflation-protected securities. Inflation-protected securities (also known as inflation-indexed securities) are securities whose principal and/or interest payments are adjusted for inflation, unlike conventional debt securities that make fixed principal and interest payments. Inflation-protected securities include Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities ("TIPS"), which are securities issued by the U.S. Treasury. The principal value of TIPS is adjusted for inflation (payable at maturity) and the semi-annual interest payments by TIPS equal a fixed percentage of the inflation-adjusted principal amount. These inflation adjustments are based upon the Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers (CPI-U). The original principal value of TIPS is guaranteed, even during periods of deflation. At maturity, TIPS are redeemed at the greater of their inflation-adjusted principal or par amount at original issue. Other types of inflation-protected securities may use other methods to adjust for inflation and other measures of inflation. In addition, inflation-protected securities issued by entities other than the U.S. Treasury may not provide a guarantee of principal value at maturity.

Generally, the Inflation-Protected Portfolio will purchase inflation-protected securities with maturities between five and twenty years from the date of settlement, although it is anticipated that, at times, the Portfolio will purchase securities outside of this range. The Portfolio ordinarily will have an average weighted maturity, based upon market values, between three to twelve years. The Inflation-Protected Portfolio is authorized to invest more than 25% of its total assets in U.S. Treasury bonds, bills and notes and obligations of U.S. government agencies and instrumentalities. The Portfolio will not shift the maturity of its investments in anticipation of interest rate movements.

The Inflation-Protected Portfolio may purchase or sell futures contracts and options on futures contracts, to adjust market exposure based on actual or expected cash inflows to or outflows from the Portfolio. The Portfolio does not intend to sell futures contracts to establish short positions in individual securities or to use derivatives for purposes of speculation or leveraging investment returns.

The Inflation-Protected Portfolio may lend its portfolio securities to generate additional income.

Principal Risks The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return, are market risk, interest rate risk, inflation-protected securities tax risk, inflation-protected securities interest rate risk, credit risk, risks of investing for inflation protection, income risk, liquidity risk, derivatives risk, securities lending risk and cyber security risk.

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Dodge and Cox International Stock Fund
Investment Objective and Principal Strategies. The Fund seeks long-term growth of principal and income. The Fund invests primarily in a diversified portfolio of equity securities issued by non-U.S. companies from at least three different foreign countries, including emerging markets. Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest at least 80% of its total assets in common stocks, preferred stocks, securities convertible into common stocks, and securities that carry the right to buy common stocks of non-U.S. companies. The Fund invests primarily in medium-to-large well established companies based on standards of the applicable market. In selecting investments, the Fund invests primarily in companies that, in Dodge & Cox's opinion, appear to be temporarily undervalued by the stock market but have a favorable outlook for long-term growth. The Fund also focuses on the underlying financial condition and prospects of individual companies, including future earnings, cash flow, and dividends. Various other factors, including financial strength, economic condition, competitive advantage, quality of the business franchise, and the reputation, experience, and competence of a company's management are weighed against valuation in selecting individual securities. The Fund also considers the economic and political stability of a country and the protections provided to foreign shareholders. The Fund may enter into forward currency contracts or currency futures contracts to hedge foreign currency exposure.

Principal Risks Among the principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return, are issuer risk, management risk, equity risk, market risk, liquidity risk, non-U.S. investment risk, non-U.S. currency risk and non-U.S. issuer risk.


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Dreyfus/Boston Company Small/Mid Cap Growth Fund
Investment Objective and Principal Strategies. The fund seeks long-term growth of capital. This objective may be changed without shareholder approval. To pursue its goal, the fund normally invests at least 80% of its assets in equity securities of small-cap and mid-cap U.S. companies. The fund currently considers small-cap and mid-cap companies to be those with total market capitalizations, at the time of purchase, that are equal to or less than the total market capitalization of the largest company included in the Russell 2500® Growth Index. This would correspond to companies with total market capitalizations equal to or less than $12.06 billion as of December 31, 2015. The Russell 2500 Growth Index is an unmanaged index, which is the fund.s benchmark index, that measures the performance of those Russell 2500 companies (the 2,500 smallest companies in the Russell 3000® Index (which is comprised of the 3,000 largest U.S. companies based on total market capitalization)) with higher price-to-book ratios and higher forecasted growth values. The fund.s equity investments may include common stocks, preferred stocks, convertible securities and warrants, including those purchased in initial public offerings (IPOs) or shortly thereafter. The fund also may invest in pooled investment vehicles, such as exchange traded funds (ETFs), based on the Russell 2500 Growth Index.

Principal Risks Among the principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return, are risks of stock investing, small and midsize company risk, growth stock risk, market sector risk, liquidity risk, portfolio turnover risk and non-diversification risk.


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Metropolitan West Total Return Bond Fund
Investment Objective and Principal Strategies. The Fund seeks to maximize long-term total return. The Fund pursues its objective by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets in investment grade fixed income securities or unrated securities that are determined by the Adviser to be of similar quality. Up to 20% of the Fund's net assets may be invested in securities rated below investment grade. The Fund also invests at least 80% of its net assets plus borrowings for investment purposes in fixed income securities it regards as bonds. Under normal conditions, the portfolio duration is two to eight years and the dollar weighted average maturity ranges from two to fifteen years. The Fund invests in the U.S. and abroad, including emerging markets, and may purchase securities of varying maturities issued by domestic and foreign corporations and governments. The Adviser will focus the Fund's portfolio holdings in areas of the bond market (based on quality, sector, coupon or maturity) that the Adviser believes to be relatively undervalued.

Investments include various types of bonds and other securities, typically corporate bonds, notes, collateralized bond obligations, collateralized debt obligations, mortgage-related and asset-backed securities, bank loans, money-market securities, swaps, futures, municipal securities, options, credit default swaps, private placements and restricted securities. These investments may have interest rates that are fixed, variable or floating.

Derivatives will be used in an effort to hedge investments, for risk management, or to increase income or gains for the Fund. The Fund may also seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in which it invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques.

Principal Risks The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return, are market risk, interest rate risk, credit risk, foreign investment risk, securities selection risk, portfolio management risk, prepayment risk of asset-backed and mortgage-backed securities, extension risk of asset-backed and mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities investment risk, derivatives risk, swap agreements risk and liquidity risk.


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Morgan Stanley Institutional - Emerging Markets Portfolio
Investment Objective and Principal Strategies. The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation by investing primarily in growth-oriented equity securities of issuers in emerging market countries. The Adviser and the Portfolio's "Sub-Advisers," Morgan Stanley Investment Management Company ("MSIM Company") and Morgan Stanley Investment Management Limited ("MSIM Limited"), seek to maximize returns by investing primarily in growth-oriented equity securities in emerging markets.

The Adviser's and Sub-Advisers' investment approach combines top-down country allocation with bottom-up stock selection. The Adviser and Sub-Advisers allocate the Portfolio's assets among emerging markets based on relative economic, political and social fundamentals, stock valuations and investor sentiment. To manage risk, the Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers emphasize macroeconomic and fundamental research.

Under normal circumstances, at least 80% of the Portfolio's assets will be invested in equity securities of issuers located in emerging market countries. This policy may be changed without shareholder approval; however, you would be notified in writing of any changes. The Adviser and/or Sub-Advisers generally consider selling an investment when they determine the company no longer satisfies their investment criteria.

The Portfolio may, but it is not required to, use derivative instruments for a variety of purposes, including hedging, risk management, portfolio management or to earn income. The Portfolio's use of derivatives may involve the purchase and sale of derivative instruments such as futures and other related instruments and techniques. The Portfolio may utilize foreign currency forward exchange contracts, which are also derivatives, in connection with its investments in foreign securities. Derivative instruments used by the Portfolio will be counted toward the Portfolio's 80% policy discussed above to the extent they have economic characteristics similar to the securities included within that policy.

Principal Risks The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return, are equity securities risk, foreign and emerging markets securities risk and derivatives risk.


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PIMCO Real Return
Investment Objective and Principal Strategies. The Fund seeks maximum real return, consistent with the preservation of real capital and prudent investment management. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing under normal circumstances at least 80% of its net assets in inflation-indexed bonds of varying maturities issued by the U.S. and non-U.S. governments, their agencies or instrumentalities, and corporations. The Fund invests primarily in investment grade debt securities, but may invest up to 10% of its total assets in high yield securities ("junk bonds") rated B or higher by Moody's or S&P, or, if unrated, determined by PIMCO to be of comparable quality. The Fund may also invest up to 30% of its total assets in securities denominated in foreign currencies, and may invest beyond this limit in U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers. The Fund may invest up to 10% of its total assets in securities and instruments that are economically tied to emerging market countries. The Fund will normally limit its foreign currency exposure to 20% of its total assets. The Fund is non-diversified, which means that it may concentrate its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a diversified fund. The Fund may invest all of its assets in derivative instruments, such as options, futures contracts or swap agreements, or in mortgage- or asset-backed securities. The Fund may also invest up to 10% of its total assets in preferred stocks. The Fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers and other financial institutions to earn income.

Principal Risks The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return, are: interest rate risk, credit risk, high yield risk, market, risk, issuer risk, liquidity risk, derivatives risk, equity risk, mortgage-related and other asset-backed risk, foreign (non- U.S.), investment risk, emerging markets risk, currency risk, issuer non-diversification risk, leveraging risk, management risk, and short sale risk.


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TIAA-CREF S&P 500 Index
Investment Objective and Principal Strategies. The Fund seeks a favorable long-term total return, mainly through capital appreciation, by investing primarily in a portfolio of equity securities of large domestic companies selected to track U.S. equity markets based on a market index. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets (net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in securities of its benchmark index (the S&P 500® Index). The Fund may use a sampling approach to create a portfolio that closely matches the overall investment characteristics (for example, market capitalization and industry weightings of securities) of its index without investing in all of the stocks in the index. The Fund is designed to track various U.S. equity markets as a whole or a segment of these markets. The Fund primarily invests its assets in equity securities selected to track a designated stock market index. Because the return of an index is not reduced by investment and other operating expenses, the Fund's ability to match its index is negatively affected by the costs of buying and selling securities as well as the fund's fees and other expenses. The use of a particular index by the Fund is not a fundamental policy and may be changed without shareholder approval.

Principal Risks.Among the principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return, are market risk, index risk, company risk and large-cap risk.


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